Learning to Be a Leader

He says there are three inherent qualities of a leader: to have a purpose, to have a passion for this purpose, and to have courage.  The rest of “leadership,” he says, can be taught.

But teaching leadership skills and techniques is fraught with risk.  A survey of American companies found that while they invest about $16 billion a year into leadership training, two-thirds of CEOs thought the training wasn’t effective.

Weekly Roundup: Oct 21-25, 2019

John Kamensky

Laboratories of Democracy in Action: Investing in What Works

This “do what works” approach is global and is premised “on the assumption that increased use of research evidence will lead to better outcomes in terms of effectiveness, accountability, and sustainability,” according to a recent article by Roman Kislov et al in Public Administration Review.

Weekly Roundup: Oct 14-18, 2019

John Kamensky

Weekly Roundup: Oct 7-11, 2019

John Kamensky

Weekly Roundup: Sept 30 - Oct 3, 2019

John Kamensky

Agile Government. Federal News Network’s Jason Miller reports on federal IT policy and agile management.

Revisiting “Gaming in Target World”

A recent article in Harvard Business Review reminded me of a favorite 2016 article in Public Administration Review by the British academic Christopher Hood, “Gaming in Target World.” Hood’s article recounted the problems created during the Tony Blair government when performance targets were widely used and tied to consequences affecting individual public servants.

Behavioral Science: A Revolutionary Potential for Government? (Part VIII)

But  according to Apolitical, an international online magazine covering the public sector, “over the past nine years, a revolution has been spreading through governments around the world. Today, over 200 public bodies are using a combination of behavioural science, economics and psychology to craft better policy.”

Creating a Critical Mass of Talent and Resources for the Use of Behavioral Science in Government (Part VII)

More specifically, what is being done to foster the continued organic growth in the understanding and use of these approaches in the public sector? And how do we bridge their use between academics and practitioners?

Weekly Roundup: August 26-30, 2019

John Kamensky

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Senior Fellow
IBM Center for The Business of Government
600 14th Street, NW Second Floor
Washington, DC 20005
United States
202-551-9341

Mr. Kamensky is a Senior Fellow with the IBM Center for The Business of Government and an Associate Partner with IBM's Global Business Services.

During 24 years of public service, he had a significant role in helping pioneer the federal government's performance and results orientation. Mr. Kamensky is passionate about helping transform government to be more results-oriented, performance-based, customer-driven, and collaborative in nature.

Prior to joining the IBM Center, he served for eight years as deputy director of Vice President Gore's National Partnership for Reinventing Government. Before that, he worked at the Government Accountability Office where he played a key role in the development and passage of the Government Performance and Results Act.

Since joining the IBM Center, he has co-edited six books and writes and speaks extensively on performance management and government reform.  Current areas of emphasis include transparency, collaboration, and citizen engagement.  He also blogs about management challenges in government.

Mr. Kamensky is a fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration and received a Masters in Public Affairs from the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs, in Austin, Texas. He can be reached at: john.kamensky@us.ibm.com

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