Should Government Reorganize Itself? (Part VI)

Typically, the cultural, administrative, and legal barriers to working together collaboratively inside the federal government are too high and they discourage efforts to collaborate (more on this in a future post).  The Obama Administration has taken some steps, such as the president’s directive last year that encourages administrative flexibility by federal agencies when working with state and local governments.

Should Government Reorganize Itself? (Part V)

Should government use Legos to inspire its reorganization approach?

Structural reorganization initiatives – like the creation of the Department of Homeland Security -- are slow, take an enormous amount of effort, and require years to become effective.  Ultimately, the new structure becomes rigid and needs to be revisited.  Many observers advocate creating more adaptable approaches that allow a mix and match of capabilities.  What are some potential options for doing this?

Executive Branch Options

Should Government Reorganize Itself? (Part IV)

When Vice President Gore’s reinventing government team was being formed in the early 1990s, he encouraged it to not focus on reorganizing agencies and programs, but rather to fix what’s inside the agencies.  He also advocated the creation of “virtual agencies.”  At the time, no one really understood what he was talking about, but today – with the technologies now available – it is really possible.

Should Government Reorganize Itself? (Part III)

What are some of the lessons from past efforts?

Should Government Reorganize Itself? (Part II)

Beginning in 1932, presidents were periodically granted authority by Congress to submit plans to reorganize agencies.  Over time, it became increasingly limited in scope and when this authority expired in 1984, presidents since then have not asked for it to be renewed, until now.

Creating Networks that Work

The President’s FY 2013 budget announced the first set of cross-agency priority goals – seven focus on mission-related goals such as doubling the number of U.S. exports by 2014, and seven focus on mission-support goals, such as closing critical skill gaps in the federal workforce. “Lead government officials” were named to lead each of these goals. How will they choose to approach their tasks? A friend just sent me a copy of a new book “Networks that Work,” by Paul Vandeventer and Myrna Mandell.

Leading the U.S. Government Accountability Office: Insights from Gene Dodaro, Comptroller General

accountability to the American people? Last month, Comptroller General Gene Dodaro joined me on The Business of Government Hour to explore these questions and so much more. Here are some insights from this discussion:

Leading the U.S. Government Accountability Office: Insights from Gene Dodaro, Comptroller General

How is GAO working to help put the country back on a sustainable fiscal path? What is GAO doing to assist Congress in support of its oversight of decision making responsibilities? How is GAO overseeing federal programs and operations to ensure accountability to the American people? Last month, Comptroller General Gene Dodaro joined me on The Business of Government Hour to explore these questions and so much more. Here are some insights from this discussion:

 

Creating Networks that Work

How will the 14 newly-designated cross-agency priority goal leaders organize to achieve the goals they’ve committed to achieve? There’s a practical guide book that can help.

CAP Goals: A New Government Acronym (Part 2)

ss cross-cutting management challenges facing agencies.

CAP GOALS FOR MISSION-SUPPORT FUNCTIONS:

CAP Goal 8:  Cybersecurity.  Increase federal information system cybersecurity.By 2014, achieve 95 percent utilization of critical administration cybersecurity capabilities on federal information systems, including strong authentication, Trusted Internet Connections (TIC), and Continuous Monitoring.

Goal Leader:  Howard A. Schmidt, U.S. Cybersecurity Coordinator.

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